Category: Writing

Ghetto Fabulous: Andre Harrell Created a Culture of Black Excellence (Billboard)

The night Andre Harrell died, I DM’d my editor at Billboard to tell him that whatever they were going to do for Dre, I was raising my hand. I knew a slew of outlets’ headers would read “… who discovered Sean Combs,” and Dre’s impact was so much bigger than that; larger and farther reaching

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7 Unofficial Rules to Not F**k #Verzuz Up – Billboard

As we’ve collectively watched Swizz Beats and Timbaland’s producer battle series grow, there’ve been several teaching moments for how not to kill the vibe and energy that attracts everyone to what has become prime quarantine programming. But the thee-day (really three-week), two-part Teddy Riley vs Babyface battle was a whole dissertation on putting too much

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The Year Soul Music Fought Back

As part of Billboard‘s celebration for all things 2000 last week, I wrote about Neo Soul’s mainstream breakthrough, and why it didn’t last long. If you chart modern R&B’s course on a map, you’ll notice a giant fork in the path around the year 2000. Actually, it was more of a massive roundabout, leading to

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Industry Rule No. 1 is Industry Rule No. 4080 – Still

You’ve likely peeped that there’s a call-out moment happening with artists and their first contracts. Kelis and Mase are addressing false promises, low earnings, and jacked publishing with Pharrell and Puffy, respectively. But how much of this is just business and how much of it is, indeed, sheisty? I wrote about complicated contracts and the

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Your Musical Guide to the Blackness of Beyoncé’s Homecoming

I (humbly) wrote for Billboard about the power and significance in Beyoncé’s musical choices for Homecoming, and how she used them to weave Black history and culture throughout the live albums 40 tracks. This is your song by song guide to the intentionally Black Homecoming experience. Last April, Beyoncé staged a headlining set at Coachella unlike

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